Second language teacher education
edited by Jack C. Richards and David Nunan
edited by Jack C. Richards and David Nunan

Dnes vráceno
Knihy
1st publ.
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1990;
XII, 340 s. : obr.
Ostatní autoři: Richards, Jack C.,; Nunan, David,
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Contents
List of contributors ix Preface xi
Part I Issues and approaches in teacher education
1	The dilemma of teacher education in second language teaching 3
Jack C. Richards
2	Beyond prescription: the student teacher as investigator 16
Jerry G. Gebhard, Sergio Gaitart, and Robert Oprandy
3	Activities and procedures for teacher preparation 26 Rod Ellis
Questions and tasks 37
Part II Investigating teachers and learners in the classroom 41
4	Teacher observation in second language teacher education 43
Richard R. Day
5	Action research in the language classroom 62 David Nunan
6	Understanding classroom role relationships 82 Tony Wright
Questions and tasks 98
Contents
Part III The practicum 101
7	Intervening in practice teaching 103 Donald Freeman
8	Interaction in a teaching practicum 118 Jerry G. Gebhard
9	A professional development focus for the language teaching practicum 132
Martha C. Pennington
Questions and tasks 153
Part IV Supervision 155
10	Models of supervision: choices 156 Jerry G. Gebhard
11	Clinical supervision of language teaching: the supervisor as trainer and educator 167
Stephen Gaies and Roger Bowers
12	“Let’s see”: contrasting conversations about teaching 182 John F. Fanselow
Questions and tasks 198
Part V Self-observation in teacher development 201
13	Teacher development through reflective teaching 202 Leo Bartlett
14	The use of diary studies in teacher education programs 215 Kathleen M. Bailey
15	An ongoing dialogue: learning logs for teacher preparation 227
Patricia A. Porter, Lynn M. Goldstein, Judith Leatherman, and Susan Conrad
Questions and tasks 241
Contents
Part VI Case studies 243
16	A blueprint for a teacher development program 245 Dale L. Lange
17	Developing teachers’ language resources 269 Robert Keith Johnson
18	An ethnographic approach to inservice preparation: the Hungary file 282
Fraida Dubin and Rita Wong
19	Observing classroom behaviors and learning outcomes in different second language programs 293
Nina Spada
Questions and tasks 311
References 313
Index 329
Index
Page numbers in italics indicate material in tables or figures.
Abbs, P., 184, 195 Abe, D„ 83
Acheson, K., 47, 49, 51, 169 action research
curriculum development and, 62, 63, 64-75
developing skills in, 62 see also research action-system knowledge, 43 Adams, R., 51
Adult Immigrant Education Program (AMEP), see Australian Adult Immigrant Education Program
Ahlbrand, W.P., 18, 121 Ain Shams University (Egypt), 173 Alinsky, S.D., 183 Alien, P., 19, 165, 304, 306, 307 alternative supervision, 158—9 see also supervision AMEP, see Australian Adult Immigrant Education Program (AMEP)
American Council on Teaching of Foreign Languages, 257, 259 American Education Research Association, 252 Anderson, L.M., 11 Apple, M., 205 appraisal (reflective teaching), 212-13 Aron, J., 120 Ashburn, E.A., 119 Asher, A.L., 216 assessment, 62 see also evaluation Atkinson, M.J., 120
at-task behavior, teacher observation and coding, 51-2 audio recordings
classroom language program and, 275-8, 280-1 COLT and, 302 diary studies and, 220, 222 mapping (reflective teaching) and, 209
self-help supervision and, 165 student teacher practicum study and, 120
supervisory note taking and, 186 teacher observation and, 46 teacher preparation activities and, 28-9, 164
Australian Adult Immigrant Education Program (AMEP) conclusion concerning, 75-6 curriculum development analysis and, 62, 63, 64-75 teachers as researchers and, 64, 70-3, 75
worksheets for, 77—81
Bailey, K.M., 119, 209, 216, 219 Bailey, L.G., 19 Barnes, D., 18, 90, 92, 191 Bartlett, V.L., 224 Beilack, A.H., 121 Berliner, D.C., 7, 11, 119 Bernhardt, E.B., 251, 252 Berreman, G.D., 120 Biddle, B.J., 16, 51 bilingual education, 252 Blatchford, C.H., 158 Blum, R.E., 9
329
Index
Bogdan, R., 219 Bolitho, R., 176 Brazil, D., 275 Britten, D., 284 Bronowski, J., 196-7 Brophy, J.E., 11, 52, 53—4 Brown, C., 216, 222, 223 Brumfit, C., 83 Burt, M., 124
Butler-Wall, B., 217, 224-5
Candlin, C., 89 Candy, Vincent, 195 Carnegie Forum, 245, 246 Carney, R., 195 Carroll, John ?., 252 case studies
Egyptian clinical supervision, 173-81
teacher preparation activities, 29 teachers and LEP students and, 13 training view of teacher preparation and, 14
Yugoslavian clinical supervision, 171-3
Centre for Developing English Language Teaching (CDELT, Egypt), 173, 174 Challenges: Teacher's Handbook (Chandlin and Edelhoff), 89 Chamot, A.U., 247 children, COLT and, 295 classroom-centered research (CCR), 20
see also research
classroom interaction (AMEP worksheet), 81
classroom language program aim of, 269-70 evaluation of, 280—1 interpersonal aspect of, 274—5 language laboratory exercises, 271-2
pedagogical aspect of, 275-80 physiological aspect of, 273—4 spoken language and, 271 teaching of, 270-1 teaching materials and, 272—3
classroom management, 274 AMEP program worksheet and,
74, 79
teacher education and, 8—9,
10-11
teacher observation and, 53 classroom observation, see observation; teacher observation classroom performance clinical supervision case study and, 172
clinical supervision and views on, 169-70
see also student teacher entries-, supervision
classroom power relationships (reciprocal), 212
classroom practice, reflective teaching and, 203
classroom role relationships, see role relationships (teacher and learner)
classroom rules (student teacher attitude exercise), 143 classroom seating (student teacher practicum study), 121 classroom teaching clinical supervision in Yugoslavian case study and, 173 student teacher and, 17—18 see also student teacher entries-, supervision clinical supervision defining, 168—71 Egyptian case study of, 173—81 Yugoslavian case study of, 171—3 see also supervision Cogan, M., 159 Cohen, L., 63-4
collaboration with colleagues, 210, 211
collaborative supervision, 159—60 see also supervision COLT (Communication Orientation of Language Teaching), 18, 19, 116, 165, 189
classroom instructional characteristics and, 298—300
330
Index
communicative language teaching theory and, 301
communicative orientation and, 296-7, 306
ESL and, 293, 295, 296, 297, 299, 300, 301, 308
FSL and, 293, 295, 296, 297, 299,
300
instructional input and learning output, 304—6
instructional program types and, 294-5
intensive instruction and, 297—8 as observation instrument, 293—4 process-oriented studies and, 295—
301
process-product orientation studies and, 301-7
program similarities and, 300 results of studies using, 307-8 communicative activity, 31-32, 33, 34
communicative orientation (COLT), 296-7, 306 competence
LEP students and, 12-13 reflective teaching and, 248—9 comprehensible input concept, 191 Comprehensive English Language Test, 301
contact-matter teaching, 4—9, 14 contesting (reflective teaching), 211-12
Cooper, J.M., 267 Copeland, M., 107, 158 Coulthard, M., 275 counseling, see supervision Crawford-Lange, L.M., 258 creative supervision, 162—3 see also supervision Crippendorf, K., 219 Crookes, G., 7 Cruickshank, D.R., 202, 248 cultural awareness (teacher development program), 262 see also ethnographic approach cultural environment (SLA), 258 see also ethnographic approach
Curran, C, 111, 112, 160, 161 curriculum development
action research analysis and, 64-75
AMEP and, 63 teachers and, 62
Davies, F., 280 Day, R.R., 19 De Bono, E., 162
decentralization (societal structure), 255
Deen, J., 217, 224 demographic shifts (U.S.), 255 demonstrations, 32 development strategy (student teacher), 103-4 Dewey, J., 207 diary studies benefits of, 224—5 clinical supervision case study (Egypt) and, 179 defining, 215
for language learning, 215—18, 222-4
language learning theory and, 221-2
learning process and, 223-4 note taking in class and, 222 procedures for keeping, 218—21 see also learning logs directive supervision, 156-8 see also supervision discourse analysis, 281 discourse (COLT), 297, 303 DISTAR program, teacher education analysis and, 10 Doughty, C., 63 Dulay, FL, 124 Dunkin, M., 16
Early, P., 176, 284 Edelhoff, C, 89
educational ethnography, see ethnographic approach
Egyptian clinical supervision study, 173-81
see also supervision
331
Index
elicitation (teacher preparation activity), 33
elocution, 273
engaged time, see time-on-task (engaged time) concept English as a foreign language (EFL)
Egyptian case study and, 173—81 ethnographic approach and, 282, 289, 290
Yugoslavian case study and,
171-3
English as a second language (ESL) COLT and, 293, 295, 296, 297, 299, 300, 301, 308 ethnographic observation example and, 45, 54-7
journal use analysis and, 232, 237 SCORE and, 49-53 teacher development and, 251-4, 262, 264
teaching practicum study and, 118,119,124,129 errors
analytical skills development and, 145
feedback (supervisory) and, 185, 192
student teacher practicum study and treatment of, 123—5 ethnographic approach American course in Hungary and, 288-91
English as a second and foreign language and, 282 inservice training and, 282—4 local culture and 1ST participant’s teaching situation and, 286-8
preparatory information-gathering process and, 285-6 teacher observation and, 44, 45—6, 47
teacher observation example and, 54-7
see also cultural awareness
(teacher development program); cultural environment (SLA)
evaluation
AMEP program and, 75 AMEP program and teacher-dominated lesson, 67-8 AMEP program and teacher talk and behavior, 72—3 classroom exchanges, 277—8 of classroom language program, 280-1
clinical supervision and, 172,
177
as different from assessment, 62 journal use and, 238, 240 reflective teaching and peer, 248 self-evaluation, 63, 74 of teacher, 4—5
of teacher development program, 266-8
see also supervision Evertson, C.M., 11 experimental teacher preparation practices, 26—7, 36 see also teacher preparation activities
experimentation, teacher development and, 255, 257
Fanselow,]., 16, 18, 19, 21, 120, 124, 129, 158-9, 163, 165 Far West Laboratory for Education Research and Development, 6 feedback, 226, 237 AMEP program and, 68—9, 71 effective teaching and, 7 of errors (student teacher practicum study), 124
role relationships analysis and, 87 supervision and, 185, 187 teacher development program and, 265
video viewing and role playing exercise and,150 Fisher, C.W., 11 Flanders, N.A., 19, 163, 179 Flanders’s sign system, 19 FOCUS (Foci in Communication Used in Settings), 19, 116, 163, 165,189
332
Index
discussion of teaching example and, 23
teaching practicum research and, 120,127,131
Freeman, D., 112, 158, 162, 183
Freire, P., 22, 129, 163, 184, 196, 213, 259
French as a second language (FSL), COLT and, 293, 295, 296, 297, 299, 300
Fröhlich, ML, 19, 165, 295-6
Frota, S.N., 223
Gage, N.L., 119 Galbo, J.J., 204 Gall, M.D., 47, 49, 51, 169 Gardner, K., 280 Gebhard, J.G., 16, 17, 24 Geva, E., 19, 165 Gibb, J., 105-6, 111, 114, 116 Good, T.L., 12, 52, 53-4, 119 Gore, J., 204, 248 Gospodinoff, R.L.K., 120 grammar (COLT), 303, 305, 306, 307, 308 Greene, T., 280 Gremmo, M., 83 group discussions, 32, 33, 35 grouping of learners, 12 supervision analysis and, 187—8 group management, 53, 59 group task (AMEP program), 67—8, 69, 74, 78
Hammadou, J., 251, 252 Handbook of Research on Teaching (American Education Research Association), 252 Hawley, W.D., 246 Heritage, J., 120 Hino, N., 252 Hispanic ethnic group, 255 Hoetker, J., 18, 121 Ho Fang Wan Kam, ?., 217, 223 Holly, M.L., 209 Holton, J., 248 Hook, C., 76
How We Think (Dewey), 207 Huebner, D., 251
ideal student, student teacher attitude exercise and, 138, 143 individual praise, 58 inference, 48
information (increased flow in),
255
information mode (pedagogical aspect of classroom language program), 278-80 inservice training (1ST)
American course in Hungary and, 288-91
English as second and foreign language and, 282 general principles of, 282—6 local culture and participant’s teaching situation and, 286—8 instruction methods (reactions to), 96-7
Interaction Analysis (Flanders), 163 interactive mode (pedagogical aspect of classroom language program), 277-8 intervention defined, 105 see also student teacher intervention
investigative projects (student teacher), 21-2
Jackson, P.W., 251 Jacobson, L., 52
Jarvis, G.A., 16, 22, 129, 163,184 journals, see diary studies; learning logs
Joyce, B., 119
Keith, M.J., 250 Kemmis, S., 63, 204 knowledge
distinction between subject-matter and action-system, 43 twenty-first century and, 254-5 see also self-knowledge Krashen, S., 124, 191
333
Index
Lange, D.L., 257, 258, 266, 267 language teacher development, see teacher development language used in classroom, see classroom language program Lanier, J.E., 118 Larsen-Freeman, D., 250, 283 learning logs
benefits of using, 231-9, 240 giving a journal assignment and, 228-30
methodology survey and, 228,
230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237
motives for using, 227—8 procedure for using, 228—31 SLA and, 228, 229, 230, 231,
233,	235
sociolinguistics, 228, 231, 232,
234,	235, 236 teacher response to, 230—1 see also diary studies
lectures, 32 Leinhardt, G., 43 LEP students, see limited English proficiency (LEP) students lesson plans, 29
lesson preparation analysis (AMEP program), 73 lesson transcripts, 29 Lester, N.B., 227 licensure, 261, 266 Light, R.L., 16 Lightbown, P., 297, 306 limited English proficiency (LEP) students
active teaching and, 13 competence and, 12-13 see also students Liston, D.P., 202
listening activities (COLT), 300, 302 Little, J.W., 118 Long, M.H., 7, 20, 63 Lorde, D.C., 164, 188-9 Lunzer, E., 280
McDermott, Ray, 120 McIntyre, D., 14
macroteaching, see teacher education, macro (holistic education) approach to McTaggart, R., 63 managerial skills, see classroom management Manion, L., 63—4 mapping (reflective teaching),
209-10
Matsumoto, K., 219 Mayher, J.S., 227 Medley, D.M., 9 Mehan, H., 120, 196 Meredith, N., 125 methodologies, 253 overlapping of, 307 methodology survey, journal use and, 228, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237 Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency, 301
microteaching, see teacher education, micro (training view of teaching) approach to minicourses, 14 model of teacher development,
254-7
see also teacher development Montessori, M., 183 Moskowitz, G., 19, 163 motivation, 274
analysis of tasks and activities and, 60-1
teacher observation and, 53—4 movement patterns (teacher observation), 52
Mulkeen, T.A., 254, 256, 266-7
National Centre for English Language Teaching and Research (Australia), 28, 65 National Holmes Group, 245, 246 nondirective supervision, 160—1 see also supervision note taking diary studies and, 222 observing and supervising, 186—7 Nunan, David, 70
334
Index
O’Brien, T., 175
observation, 15, 166, 175, 222, 224 AMEP program and, 66—70 clinical supervision and, 168, 177, 179
grouping data, 187-8 interpreting data, 189—91 self-observation, 191—3, 201 student teacher practicum study and, 120, 124, 126 of teaching act, 18—21 technical language for transcriptions, 188—9
transcribing and note taking, 186-7
video viewing exercise and, 147 see also COLT; FOCUS; SCORE; TALOS; teacher observation Ochsner, R., 219 O’Malley, J.M., 247 operative mode (pedagogical aspect of classroom language program), 275-6
Orem, R., 103
pair discussion, 32, 33, 35, 272 panel discussion, 34 Paquette, F.A., 259 paradigms (clinical supervision case study), 177-9 Peace Corps, 283 Peck, R.F., 119 Philips, S., 119 Pica, T., 63
Porter, P.A., 216-17, 222 power relationships (reciprocal classroom), 212
practice teaching, see student teacher entries
Pradl, G.M., 111
preservice training (PST), contrasted to inservice training (1ST), 282— 3
President’s Commission on Foreign Languages and International Studies (1980), 245 problem-solving activities, 22 professional development, see stu-
dent teacher professional development professionalism in second language teacher, 3 teacher development and, 246, 250-1,258
professional meetings, 168 psycholinguistically motivated studies of teaching, 7
questions, 66
classroom language example of, 277
COLT and, 297 effective use of, 5-6, 7, 8, 9 reflective teaching and, 211 student teacher practicum and,
127
Ramani, E., 66 Rardin, J., 158
reading, time-on-task concept of,
6-7
reflective teaching analysis of, 204-5, 213-14 appraisal of, 212—213 contesting, 211—12 critical reflective teaching, 205—7 defining, 202—3 informing, 210—11 mapping, 209-10 reflective teacher analysis, 207—13, 247-50 research, 54
analytical skills analysis and, 144 classroom-centererd, 20 COLT and, 293, 294 curriculum development and action, 62, 63, 64—75 diary study, 215 effective schooling, 9-10 effective teacher, 246-7 ESL and, 253
low-inference instruments and, 48 supervision, 158
teacher development program and, 264-5
teacher education, 3, 4, 5, 7, 252
335
Index
research (coni.)
teacher expectations and, 52 teaching practicum, 118-19, 129-30
Richards, J.C., 35, 82, 247, 252 Riley, P., 83 Rodgers, T., 82 Rogers, Carl, 111, 112, 160 role playing
interactive mode (pedagogical aspect of classroom language program) and, 278
student teacher development and video viewing and, 146—50 supervisors and, 167 role relationships (teacher and learner)
attitudes and values, 85—8 introduction (for preservice trainees) to teacher and learner roles and, 92—4
new teaching materials and ideas and, 88-92
nondirective supervision and,
161
questions and doubts concerning focus on, 94-5
reactions to differing instruction methods and, 96—7 reasons for focus on teacher and learner roles, 82—4 SLA student teacher and, 258—9 Rosenshine, Barak, 252 Rosenthal, R., 52 Roth, D., 120 Rowe, M.B., 20, 158
Sadow, C, 238 Scheflen, A.E., 120 Schenkein, J., 120 Schmidt, R.W., 216, 223 Schumann, John, 225 Schwab, J., 63
SCORE (Seating Chart Observation REcords), 49-52
second language acquisition (SLA) journal use and, 228, 229, 230, 231, 233, 235
teacher development and, 257—60 Second Language and Cultures program (University of Minnesota), 260-6
see also teacher development second language teacher preparation programs, see teacheer education
selective verbatim technique, 47 self-esteem, directive supervision and, 156, 157-8
self-help—explorative supervision, 163-6
see also supervision self-knowledge
attitudes about language teaching and, 135-44
teacher and learner role relationships and, 85—8 seminars, 15, 168
discussion of teaching (example) and, 23
student teacher practicum and, 125-6
Shapiro-Skrobe, F., 18 Short, E.C., 267 Showers, B., 119 Simpson, R.L., 204 simulations (simulated classroom events), 14
Sinclair, J. McH., 275 SLA, see second language acquisition (SLA)
Smith, D., 43 Smith, F., 190, 191 sociolinguistics, journal use and,
228, 231, 232, 234, 235,236 Spack, R., 238
Spada, N., 19, 165, 297, 301, 306 speaking activities (COLT), 300,
302, 303
Spradley, J.P., 219 Stenhouse, L., 76 Stevick, E., 112 structuring concept, 11 student behavior analysis (AMEP program), 73
student case exercise, 145—6
336
Index
student replies, handling of, 278 students grouping of, 12
observation of student and teacher talk, 51
questions and, 5—6, 7, 8, 9 see also limited English proficiency (LEP) students student teacher, 15 defining, 104
diary studies and, 218, 221 discussing teaching, 22—4 experiences review (exercise), 142-3
guidelines for investigative projects and, 21—2 journals and, 227 “learned helplessness”, 107,
183
limitations on teacher preparation, 16
observing teaching act and, 18-21 professional development, 254,
258
reflective teaching and, 248 SLA and teacher-student relationship, 258-9 teaching a class, 17—18 see also teachers student teacher intervention characteristics of the helping process, 105—7
defining process terms, 104—5 directive form of, 107—9, 111 nondirective form of, 111-14 student teacher goals and balance of “training” strategies, 103-4 teacher-learner (teacher educator-student teacher) relationship, 103, 116-17
training/development model for educating teachers, 114-16 use of alternative form of,
109-11
student teacher observation, see teacher observation student teacher practicum study changes in patterns established in
teacher training program and, 128-9
opportunities for change in teaching behavior, 124-5 as research, 118-19, 129-30 researchers and, 130 research process procedures and, 119-21
student’s discussion of classroom and teaching experiences, 125—8 student—teacher relationships, 118 teacher education views, 118—19 teacher educators and, 129—30 teaching behavior change and,
118
student teacher professional development
education and practical training goals of, 134-5
self-knowledge (of attitudes and beliefs about language teaching), 135-44
teaching philosophy and, 132-4 subject-matter knowledge, 43 supervision aims of, 182—4 alternative, 158—9 collaborative, 159—60 creative, 162—3 data and, 186-7, 189-91 defining clinical, 168—71 directive, 156-8 Egyptian case study of clinical, 173-81
helping and, 182-3, 193, 195-6 meanings in conversations about teaching and, 193-5 nondirective, 160-1 note taking and, 186—7 practices in, 184—93 self-help-explorative, 163-6 self-observation and, 191—3 supervisor roles and, 156 technical language and, 188-9 training and education functions and, 169-71
words implying judgments and,
195
337
Index
supervision (cont.)
Yugoslavian case study of clinical, 171-3
TALOS (Target Language Observation Scheme), 19, 116, 165, 189 Tarone, E., 247 tasks
AMEP worksheet and, 80 defining teacher, 11 motivational analysis (teacher observation) of, 60-61 new teaching material analysis and, 91-2
tapes and classroom language, 275-6
teacher and learner role relationships and, 94
teacher preparation activity, 27, 30, 31
Taylor, Roy, 92 Taylor, S.J., 219
teacher and student role relationship, see role relationships (teacher and learner)
teacher and student talk, 51 teacher behavior analysis (AMEP program), 73
teacher behavior, categories of, 8, 9 student teachers and, 19—20 teacher development analysis of teaching and, 203-4, 213
effective teacher research and, 246-7
model of, 254-7 need for change in, 251—4 professional development and, 250-1
program evaluation and, 266—8 program for, 260—6 second language framework of, 257-60
teacher education and, 245-6 see also reflective teaching teacher education categories of teacher behavior and, 8
developments in, 3, 245 entrance standards and, 255 implications of knowledge-based society and, 254-5 inservice training and, 284 macro (holistic education) approach to, 9—13, 14-15 micro (training view of teaching) approach to, 4-9, 14 professionalism and, 3 reports on, 245—6 student teacher practicum study and, 118-19 theoretical basis of, 3-4 teacher education practicum, see student teacher practicum study teacher expectations, 52—53 teacher observation
at-task behavior coding and,
51-2
audio and video recordings and,
46
classroom management and, 53 ethnographic observation in an ESL classroom (example) and, 54-7
ethnography and, 44, 45-6, 47 group management and, 53, 59 motivation and, 53—4, 60—1 movement patterns and, 52 purpose of formal program of, 43-4
qualitative approaches to, 44-5 quantitative approaches to, 47—9 SCORE and, 49-52 selective verbatim techniques and,
47
teacher and student talk and, 51 teacher expectations and, 52—3 transition periods and, 53, 59 see also observation teacher preparation activities awareness-raising practices and, 26, 27, 36, 164
experimental practices and, 26—
7, 36
outline of, 26—8 procedures for, 32—4
338
Index
sample activity and, 30-1 sample plan and, 34, 35 tasks to perform and, 27, 30,
31
ways of providing data, 27, 2830, 31 teachers
curriculum development and, 62 defining teacher educator, 104 as researchers, 64, 70—3, 75 research on effective, 246-7 student teacher practicum study and teacher educator, 129—30 third world, 176
see also student teacher; role relationships (teacher and learner) teacher supervision, see supervision teacher talk analysis (AMEP program), 72-3 teaching
attitudes about language,
135-44
clinical supervision and effective, 169
describing (by student teachers), 164-5
identifying “good,” 156—7 student teacher attitude about effective, 139, 143-4 see also reflective teaching teaching assistantships, 14 teaching behavior clinical supervision and, 169 effective teachers and, 247 reflective teaching and, 203 teaching behavior change
clinical supervision case study (Egypt) and, 176, 180 self-help-explorative supervision and, 165
student teacher and, 118, 124-5, 128-9
teaching diary, see diary studies teaching materials, teacher and learner relationship, 88—92 teaching philosophy, student teacher professional development and, 132-4
teaching situations (attitude exercise), 140-1
Telatnik, M.A., 217, 220, 221, 223 Tetenbaum, T.J., 254, 256, 266—7 textbooks, 29, 287 Tikunoff, W.J., 11, 12, 13 time-on-task (engaged time) concept, 6-7, 8-9, 274
training strategy (student teacher), 103-4
transcripts of lessons, 29 Tripp, D., 209 Tucker,J. A., 119 tutorials, 14
Ullmann, R., 19, 165 University of Minnesota, 245, 260, 263, 265-6, 267 U.S. Information Agency, 290
values, role relationships (teacher and learner) and, 85—8 van Eier, L, 224 Van Manen, M., 202 verbal flow technique, 51 video recordings, 54 AMEP program and, 66, 69 mapping (reflective teaching) and, 209
observing teaching act and, 18 role relationship analysis and, 85 self-help supervision and, 165 student teacher professional development analysis and, 146—50 teacher observation and, 46 teacher preparation activities and, 28-9
VISTA, 283
wait-time (time teacher allows after a question), 5, 6, 7, 8, 66 Walker, C„ 247 Walker, R„ 75, 76 Webb, N.M., 12
wide-lens qualitative approach, 44 Williams, E., 29 workshops, 14, 32, 168 Wragg, E.C., 19
339
Index
written ethnographies, see ethnography
Yugoslavian clinical supervision study, 171-3
see also supervision
Zeichner, K.M., 202, 203 Zimpher, N.L., 119 Zumwalt, K.K., 119
340
				
Detail
Název pole Obsah pole
Údaje o názvu Second language teacher education /
Vedlejší záhlaví - osobní jméno Richards, Jack C., 1943-
Vedlejší záhlaví - osobní jméno Nunan, David, 1948-
Vedlej z hlav pro edici - unifikovan n zev Cambridge language teaching library
Vedlejší věcné záhlaví - věcné téma angličtina
Vedlejší věcné záhlaví - věcné téma vzdělávání učitelů
Vedlejší věcné záhlaví - věcné téma jazyky
Rejstříkový termín - žánr/forma metodické příručky
Údaje o vydání 1st publ.
Nakladatelské údaje Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1990
Mezinárodní standardní číslo knihy 0-521-38779-5
Fyzický popis XII, 340 s. : obr.
Všeobecná poznámka Index
Poznámka o skryté bibliografii atd. Bibliografické odkazy
MARC
Pole Ind Obsah pole
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700 1# $a  Nunan, David, $d  1948- $7  pna2006352813 $4  edt
830 #0 $a  Cambridge language teaching library
910 ## $a  LID001 $b  A 36645 $x  kpm0116518
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